Patagonia EVERmore Trail Running Shoe Review


Patagonia Evermore Trail Running Shoe

Patagonia EVERmore Trail Running Shoe Review

I knew Patagonia made fashion shoes, I did not know they made legit running shoes. They do. Recently we reviewed the Merrell M Connect line these shoes feel like they could be part of the Merrell collection. It makes sense, they share a roof where the shoes are made. The Merrell and the Patagonia shoes could be compared to Chevy and GMC’s relationship. The profile and specs look very simular but the trimming is slightly different. Wolverine Worldwide owns both Merrell and Patagonia Footwear, but apparently they do have separate design teams. Patagonia gave us pairs of the EVERmore to review. Meaghan and Stein hit the trails see how the shoe performed. Here are the results.

Stein – When I put the Patagonia EVERmore on, the first thing I notice is snug mid-foot feel and significant arch-support. It’s not what my feet are used to, but on the trail they feel great. I’ve run from 6 to 16 miles at a time in the EVERmores and they are definitely fun. I was planning on wearing these shoes at the HAT Run 50K trail race on March 23, but had an unlucky glass-shard accident two weeks prior, on the 9th. My foot was still a little tender on race morning and I made a game-day decision to run with different shoes that have more cushioning. I was conflicted about the last-minute shoe change but I felt that the sections of road running called for more cushion than the EVERmore offers. Maybe the they will run the HAT in 2014 . . . who knows!?

The Good

Meaghan – The Patagonia EVERmore made a great first impression. There aren’t many trail shoes that I really like the look of, but this shoe won me over (see the women’s model below.) I couldn’t believe how light they were when I pulled them out of the box (women’s size 7 runs 6.3oz). The fit was almost perfect; the midfoot was a little snug (I have wide feet), but very tolerable, with plenty of room in the toe box. The shoes were designed to be worn with or without socks, but I opted for socks on each run.  The light mesh upper allowed for plenty of ventilation, but I still felt protected from the elements. The forefoot rock plate, rubber tacky sole, and lugs in the forefoot and heel provided plenty of protection and stability. I took these shoes on a few different trails with a mix of surfaces ranging from asphalt, grass, roots, and rocks. They provided stable footing through pretty much all terrains I encountered. I haven’t seen any real wear on these shoes, but I think it’s probably too early to tell.

Stein – These shoes are light and responsive; they feel like a pair of running shoes and lack any hiking-boot “bulk” that you might find in some trail shoes. They’re really light, especially for a shoe with a rock plate! There are “directional” lugs on the soles which are designed for climbing in the forefoot and descending in the heel area. They grip everything: rocks, mud, dirt, sand, up, down and lateral. I feel connected to the ground and have no worries about slipping around a turn or an off-camber section of trail. The rock plate is effective and protects your foot nicely in all conditions. After a couple soakers and some muddy conditions I can attest that the upper has great drainage and ventilation.

While the heel and mid foot feel snug and secure, the toe-box is roomy enough for your toes to splay naturally. The fore-foot area is also surprisingly flexible even with the rockplate. The tongue stays in place and the shoes feel good on my bare feet (although I always run with socks). The 4mm heel-toe drop promotes a mid-foot strike and minimalists will enjoy the ride.

The Bad

Meaghan – The only real change I would make to these shoes is some additional cushioning. Most people will probably favor the minimalist design and ability to feel the ground, but I prefer a little more support for a trail shoe.  I also could have used some additional room in the mid-foot, but again, I have wide feet.

Stein – The rock plate makes these shoes a bit stiff in the sole and also limits trail-feel. While I got over it, the snug mid-foot and arch support can feel unnerving. With minimal padding, hard packed surfaces might punish your feet. Other reviews have reported durability issues but mine are holding up fine with several trail miles on them.

The Results

Meaghan – I enjoyed all my runs in these shoes. Right out of the box they were comfortable, smooth, and required no break-in whatsoever. Anyone who enjoys minimalist shoes will appreciate the soft flex and lightweight build. I was able to feel most features of the trail while still being protected by the rock plate; however I couldn’t help but wonder what the shoe would feel like with a little more cushioning. If you’re looking for a new stylish trail shoe, I’d say these are worth a try!

Stein – Good stuff. Patagonia has made a bold entry into the light-weight trail shoe market with a clean looking and very functional shoe. These shoes have a bit of Clark Kent in them; they are unassuming but deliver on performance. Aggressive and fairly low-profile, the lugs provide good traction in a variety of conditions. The laces were functional but I swapped them out for Lock Laces, my preference. While other reviewers have compared the EVERmore’s upper to the feel of the Merrell Bare Access 2, I think they feel even more like the Road Glove 2. If you have a fairly light gait and you love minimal shoes, then give give the Patagonia EVERmore a try.

Women's Patagonia EVERmoreFrom Patagonia

  • Air mesh and microfiber overlay in a trail runner style
  • Lace-up front, padded tongue and collar
  • Protective leather toe and heel bumper
  • Dri-Lex(R) lining with Aegis(TM) Microbe Shield
  • Cushioning 2mm insole
  • 4mm drop, EVERlight EVA midsole
  • 1mm forefoot EVA rock plate
  • EVERtough tacky rubber traction outsole
  • Weights 7.8 oz (1/2 pair)

Patagonia EVERmore Review on Runblogger
P
atagonia Evermore review on Average Guy Hits The Road

 

Originally published on Believe In The Run